CURVE CULTURE [The Studio]

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT CHICAGO

[PROFESSOR PAUL ANDERSEN]

SITE: STAPLETON DENVER, COLORADO

SPRING 2013

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[CURVE CULTURE: VOLUME 1]

[CURVE CULTURE: VOLUME 2]

This studio sequence follows the preceding research seminar (Curve Culture: Volume 1 and 2) and brings contemporary aspects of regular curvature to produce variation. This investigation is in the context of a suburban development.

These suburban block types look at how variation and repetition can be produced by scaling different parts of form. In addition to creating variations of house and street forms, these block types also question a buildings identity and how it can drastically change when scaled, even while maintaining its form.

While looking at traditional suburbs in order to quantify varying factors (housing densities, greenbelt spaces and lot size relationships), these suburban blocks push form to the street edge as a means to generate geometry while eliminating the front yard in order to discover what changes can begin to generate as a result.

The Court

The "court" street type is commonly seen in the typical suburban development. Variations in scale enable different uses of the land in such that large courts allow housing on both the inner and outer street edge while small courts can only have houses on the outer street edge.

Graphic Design Analysis

As part of the research portion of this course, a series of formal analysis looks at the technique of euclidean geometry as seen in contemporary graphics. Maintaining the idea that architecture and graphic design have been mutually influential on each another, this studio continues to look and analyze various contemporary logos. While regular curvature has been greatly developed throughout history, the fillet in particular will maintain of greatest interest through this project.

Centennial, Colorado Analysis

[1] Lot to Block: 56% [2] Road to Block: 9% [3] House to Lots: 24% [4] House to Block: 14% [5] Front Yard to Lots: 26% [6] Front Yard to Block: 15% [7] Backyard to Lots: 49% [8] Backyard to Block: 28%

Looking at the suburb of Centennial gives an understanding of street patterns, housing densities, greenbelt spaces, lot size relationships and other varying factors that are found in existing suburban developments. This series looks to quantify specific factors in which help set a precedent for formulating designs.

Neighborhood Block: Scheme 1

This highly articulated street form yields a tight fit relationship with building forms. As a result, houses hug the street edge and outdoor recreation is pushed to the rear, creating a greenbelt through the outer periphery. Housing is scaled proportionally so that the form increases as the category of size goes from small to medium and medium to large.

Neighborhood Block: Scheme 2

This simply articulated street form yields a loose fit relationship with building forms. While houses along side the street edge eliminate the front yard and are pushed to the street edge, the other houses are spaced relatively in a way that community spaces of varying sizes are formed. Housing is scaled such that large buildings are a single story in height and small buildings are double story in height.

Street Types

New street layouts are made by applying a logic of repetition and variation found in contemporary graphic design. These street forms look at the suburban "court" and generate new forms primarily through three varying scales.

Lot Types

[1] Single Island Lot, [2] Double Island Lot, [3] Peninsula Lot, [4] Sandwich Lot, [5] Single Facade Lot, [6] Double Facade Lot

Street form as designed with the logic of repetition and variation is a generator for building form and the exploration of tight fit configurations.

Housing Form: Interior Lot Housing

This housing type is a result of street form in which building mass is pushed to its boundaries. The remaining building form continues the sensibility of line types found in the street form and curve culture. Variation is explored through scale so what may be a light well in a small sized form becomes a courtyard in a medium sized form. Continuing in scale, the courtyard may become a terrace that overlooks the courtyard below in a large sized form.

Housing Form: Exterior Lot Housing

Similar to interior lot housing, this housing type is a result of street form in which building mass is pushed to its boundaries and the remaining building form continues the sensibility of line types found in the street form and curve culture. Variation is explored through multiple opportunities for light wells, courtyards, terraces and terraces overlooking courtyards, depending on scale. Parking garages can inhabit large and small volumes, or both.

Housing Form: Street Bend Housing

This housing type maintains a single facade along the street edge. Similar to other housing forms, the remaining building form continues the sensibility of line types found in the street form and curve culture. Variation is explored through multiple opportunities for light wells, courtyards, terraces and terraces overlooking courtyards, depending on scale.

Housing Form: Corner Lot Housing

This housing type maintains a double facade along the street edge. While not as apparent as other housing types, the remaining building form continues the sensibility of line types found in the street form and curve culture. Variation is explored through opportunities for light wells, courtyards, terraces and terraces overlooking courtyards, depending on scale.

© by Nayereh